Chinese New Year Food

 

The reason different types of food are so important for Chinese New Year is that food can be used to symbolise positivity and hopefulness as well as bring good luck.

 

And the significance of a food may be based on its appearance or on how the Chinese word for it sounds. Here are several Chinese foods that you might enjoy this Chinese New Year:

 

Fish

fish

In China, a fish served whole is a symbol of prosperity. In fact, a banquet is customary to serve the whole fish last, pointed toward the guest of honour. Fish also has symbolic significance because the Chinese word for fish, yu, sounds like the word for riches or abundance, and it is believed that eating fish will help your wishes come true in the year to come.

 

 

Duck

duck

Ducks represent fidelity in Chinese culture. Also, red dishes are popular at Chinese New Year because red is the colour of happiness.

 

  

Chicken

Chicken

Chicken is popular at Chinese New Year because it symbolises a good marriage and the coming together of families (serving the bird whole emphasises family unity).

 

 

 

 

Seeds (lotus seeds and watermelon seeds)

seeds

Visit an Asian bakery during the Chinese New Year, and you’re likely to find a wide assortment of snacks with different types of seeds in them. The seed-filled treats represent bearing many children in Chinese culture.

 

 

Fruit (tangerines, oranges and pomelos)

orange

Tangerines and oranges are passed out freely during Chinese New Year as the words for tangerine and orange sound like luck and wealth, respectively. As for pomelos, this large ancestor of the grapefruit signifies abundance, as the Chinese word for pomelo sounds like the word for “to have”.

 

 

Cake

cake

Sweet, steamed cakes are a popular treat during Chinese New Year because the sweetness symbolises a rich, sweet life, while the layers symbolise rising abundance for the coming year and the round shapes signifies family reunion.

 

 

Dumplings

dumplings

Another popular Chinese New Year dish is jiaozi, (dumplings boiled in water). In some areas of China, coins are placed in the centre of jiaozi. Whoever bites into one of these dumplings will have an exceptionally lucky year.

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